Going Dark: The Internet Behind The Internet

The average computer user with an Internet connection has access to an amazing wealth of information. But there’s also an entire world that’s invisible to your standard Web browser. These parts of the Internet are known as the Deep Web. The tools to get to there are just a few clicks away, and more and more people who want to browse the Web anonymously are signing on. Fans of the series House of Cards might recall the Deep Web being worked into the plot of latest season. The character Lucas, a newspaper editor who was trying find a hacker, gets a little crash course from one of his reporters: “Ninety-six percent of the Internet isn’t accessible through standard search engines. Most of it’s useless but it’s where you go to find anything and everything: child porn, Bitcoin laundry, narcotics, hackers for hire …” Wired reporter Kim Zetter tells NPR’s Arun Rath that the show kind of got it right, but that there should be a distinction between what’s called the Deep Web and what are known as Darknet sites. “The Deep Web is anything not accessible through the commercial search engines,” Zetter says. Then, there’s the Darknet, a specific part of that hidden Web where you can operate in total anonymity. Without being tracked, people can access websites that sell drugs, weapons and they can even hire assassins. One such black-market site, Silk Road, got attention last fall after a crackdown by the FBI. Zeeter says the Darknet has another purpose that doesn’t usually make the news: It helps political dissidents who want to evade government censors. Read the full article here: http://www.npr.org/blogs/alltechconsidered/2014/05/25/315821415/going-dark-the-internet-behind-the-internet

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